Evolution of FCPF

Timeline

The FCPF was originally developed by the World Bank and The Nature Conservancy in 2007 as an initiative to help countries engage with an emerging concept called REDD+. This new mechanism being negotiated under the UN Framework Convention on Climate Change was looking at how developing countries could be compensated for their efforts to preserve tropical forests and in so doing reduce the emission of greenhouse gases into the atmosphere.

December 2007

The World Bank and The Nature Conservancy, along with nine donor governments launched the FCPF at the UN Climate Change Conference in Bali.

The FCPF gained critical support in 2007, when Germany, as host of the G8 Summit that year, successfully advocated for the initiative to be endorsed by G8 governments. Six months later, in December 2007, the World Bank and The Nature Conservancy, along with nine donor governments launched the FCPF at the UN Climate Change Conference in Bali (COP13).

Today, the FCPF has grown to include 47 developing countries, 17 financial contributors (including two private companies and one NGO), along with active observers from indigenous peoples, women and civil society groups, and several international delivery partners.

Learn more about the evolution of the FCPF in these 10-year anniversary resources produced in 2018:

The FCPF's 2018 Annual Report highlights national-level progress across the Facility's 47 country participants as well as global REDD+ readiness and implementation efforts.

This past year has been a significant one for the Forest Carbon Partnership Facility (FCPF), with countries leading the shift from preparing to implementing large-scale Emission Reductions Programs. This transition could not come at a more urgent time, as sustainable land use–including sustainable forest management—is a critical avenue to achieving the ambitious national targets set out in the Paris Agreement.

The 2016 Fiscal Year (FY16) report follows the structure of the Forest Carbon Partnership Facility (FCPF) program level Monitoring and Evaluation (M&E) Framework, adopted by the Participants Committee (PC) at its 14th meeting in March 2013. The M&E Framework is designed to keep track of the Facility’s performance in a way that helps to ensure that lessons can be learned and adaptive management is possible at the Facility level.

The FCPF Participants Committee adopted the General Conditions for Emission Reductions Payment Agreements that put in place the technical and legal underpinnings for future large-scale forest carbon transactions. The development of these first-of-their-kind general conditions reinforced the FCPF’s role in setting globally recognized standards for REDD+.

  • The Carbon Fund pipeline now includes 11 emission reductions programs

  • A record 13 readiness preparation grants are signed under the FCPF Readiness Fund, bringing the total number of participant countries implementing readiness activities to 35

  • FCPF and UN-REDD issueJoint Guidance for REDD+ Countries on Establishing and Strengthening Grievance Redress Mechanisms

In its sixth year of operation, the FCPF made progress shaping a diverse portfolio of large scale emission reductions programs for the Carbon Fund. Seven new ER Program Idea Notes were selected (bringing the total to eight), filling the pipeline for the Carbon Fund by two-thirds within half a year. In the Readiness Fund, a record number of 13 R-PPs were assessed by the Participants Committee, allocating a total of just under $50 million of new readiness grant funding.

  • 11 new countries join the FCPF, bringing the total to 47 participant countries

  • A total of $191 million has been allocated in readiness grant funding

  • Funding for the FCPF Readiness and Carbon Funds now totals $830 million (as of June 2014)

  • FCPF launches its REDD+ Cost Assessment Tool

In contrast to previous annual reports, the FY13 report follows the structure of the Forest Carbon Partnership Facility (FCPF) Program Level Monitoring and Evaluation (M&E) Framework, adopted by the Participants Committee (PC) at its 14th meeting in March 2013. The M&E Framework is designed to keep track of the Facility’s performance in a way that helps ensure lessons can be learned and adaptive management is possible at the Facility level.

In its fourth year of implementation, the Forest Carbon Partnership Facility (FCPF) focused on putting in place the operational framework for the transition from the Readiness Fund to the Carbon Fund. The Facility made significant progress in defining REDD+ Readiness as well as performance-based payments, building on both policy guidance from the UNFCCC and practical experience from countries implementing REDD+ Readiness activities on the ground. FY 2012 also marked a year of increased efforts to reach out to stakeholders, in particular forest-dependent Indigenous Peoples and local communities. The Facility broadened the number of Delivery Partners, which allows the FCPF to better extend technical assistance services to REDD+ Country Participants.

This report marks the third year of implementation of the FCPF. The first three years have seen the development of the FCPF and REDD+ at the global and national levels. Remarkable progress was achieved in the UNFCCC, an international REDD+ Partnership was established, and global initiatives such as the FCPF, the UN-REDD Programme, the Forest Investment Programme and the GEF’s new SFM/REDD+ window were set up to assist forest countries in tackling the REDD+ challenge. Under this new international framework, dozens of forest countries have started formulating broad strategies and investing in activities on the ground.

In the past year, the Forest Carbon Partnership Facility (FCPF) has strengthened its partnership of countries and stakeholders working together to reduce emissions from deforestation and forest degradation, and foster conservation, sustainable management of forests, and enhancement of forest carbon stocks (REDD+). Significant progress has been made in moving from a planning stage to preparations for REDD+ “Readiness” in forested developing countries.

Demonstrating activities that reduce emissions from deforestation and forest degradation in developing countries

The FCPF became operational on June 25, 2008. The first several months focused on the full and effective engagement of forest-dependent communities in REDD+ readiness efforts.

On December 11, 2007, World Bank Group President Robert B. Zoellick launched the Forest Carbon Partnership Facility (FCPF) as a groundbreaking financing mechanism to combat tropical deforestation and climate change. Through its separate but complimentary Readiness and Carbon Funds, the FCPF was developed to support and compensate developing countries for carbon dioxide reductions realized by maintaining their forests.

Ten donors (Australia, Demark, France, Finland, Germany, Japan, The Nature Conservancy, Netherlands, Switzerland, and United Kingdom) helped launch the FCPF with $160 million in funding.